Better Than Cereal Crepes

I’m fortunate to have wonderful friends that are like family to me.  I’ve known Erin since we were about 11 or 12, which is the same age that her daughter is now.  We know each other so well because we grew up together and ended up being college roommates so she is the closest thing that I have to a sister.  Luckily, we also only live about 20 minutes away now and in California that’s like being neighbors!

On most Sundays, I head over to Erin’s to go for a walk, grab brunch and chat about the past events of our week and upcoming mayhem planned for the coming week.  This particular Sunday, I came over and Erin was casually making crepes for her daughter and her two BFFs. Crepes are traditional breakfast for the kids if they have a slumber party the night before.  She said, “let me just whip up some crepes.” It was such a nonchalant statement.  Whip up some crepes?!  I always had in my head that crepes were terribly time consuming and took skill.  I was honestly a little afraid of them.  Erin happily convinced me otherwise and added “They’re better than cereal!”  No argument there!

A few years ago, she said she went in search of a recipe because she felt like eating crepes.  She tried Julia Child’s cause, don’t you have to?  For anybody that sews, we determined Julia Child was like following a dificile Vogue pattern as opposed to a Betty Crocker recipe which would be the easy McCall’s pattern. Needless to say, Betty Crocker became her go-to crepe recipe.  (Note to self: definitely have a go-to crepe recipe in your life!).

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As Erin proceeded to get her mothers’ inherited Betty Crocker book out, I continued to doubt that this crepe making process would be easy.  She proved me wrong!  It was easy and fun!

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Ingredients

1.5 cups all purpose flour

1 tablespoon sugar

1/2 teaspoon baking powder

1/2 teaspoon salt

2 cups milk

2 eggs

2 tablespoons margarine or butter, melted

1/2 teaspoon vanilla

Erin followed the directions pretty closely, mixed flour, sugar, baking powder and salt then in her mixer added milk, eggs, butter and vanilla.  It was very similar to making pancakes but this has a much more liquid consistency.  (Similar to buttermilk or even a little thicker.)

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She used a non-stick skillet, which I would highly recommend.  You should still grease the pan either with butter as Betty Crocker does or with any oil of your choice.  You need to grease in between each crepe.  Erin poured about 1/2 cup of crepe batter into the pan, then swirled the pan until the batter thinly covered the bottom of the pan.

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Let the crepe completely dry on the surface.  You’re using about a medium to low flame on the stove.  Use a spatula to loosen the edges of the crepe all the way around.  Flip the crepe once it is lightly golden on the edges.

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You can also try flipping it in the pan with a quick wrist motion!  Have a dog around for any failed attempts!

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This recipe made about 20 crepes.  The girls filled them with Nutella and bananas but you can fill them anyway you like.

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In the end, there was plenty for everyone!

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